Robin Fogarty and Associates, education consultants, coaching, seminar leaders and keynote speakers

RFA Proposal: RFA Three-Tier Professional Learning Model

PD Tier 1: Building Level Book Study

The 3-tier PD model is designed to start with a book study. Teachers and Leaders, choose from the RFA Library. The teacher teams or leadership groups manage the reading and reflecting process within the buildings or using communication media such as Skype or email, texting, twitter clusters, etc with another school.

PD Tier II: Area On-Site, Face-to-Face Conference

Then, the model calls for the team of consultants to come to a central location for a one or two days to address topics in the various books under study. The teams suggest may focus chapters for the author consultants to clarify, illuminate and reflect upon or they may prefer to have the consultant highlight the key learnings to take away.

PD Tier III: Coaching for Transfer via Video Conferencing

The final session occurs as a remote Coaching Skype or Video Conference that monitors and supports classroom behaviors as teachers implement their best take-aways. This provides authentic feedback and coaching from afar for individuals and teachers or leader pairs to

In a nutshell, RFA offers a 3-Tier PD Model that provides professional learning enhanced by best practices for adult learners using multimodal methodologies, in time-efficient ways that are highly cost effective. At the same time the tiers inherently embrace best practices in adult learning. These practices include: sustained training over time, job-embedded with onsite support, and collegial professional conversations, sharing and comparing in pre-determined peer coaching pairs, as well as grade level (ie. primary), department (ie. Math) or job alike teams (ie. principals).

     Robin Fogarty & Associates’ Three-Tiered PD Model

                  PD Tier I: Book Study with Guiding Questions

                  PD Tier II: On-Site Face-to-Face Presentations

                  PD Tier III: Coaching via Video-Conferencing

Instruction

#1 PD: Preparing Students for the Test of Life

Book: How to Teach Thinking Skills within the Common Core-Solution Tree

#2 PD: Who’s Doing the Talking? Engaging Student Learning

Book: Invite, Excite, Ignite Student LearningRobin Fogarty, PhD- Teacher College Press

#3 PD: The Right to Be Literate: Six Literacy Skills

Book: The Right to Be Literate: Brian Pete & Robin Fogarty-Solution Tree

#4 PD Differentiation: Different Brains Different Learners

Book: Supporting Differentiated Instruction: Robin Fogarty & Brian Pete-Solution Tree

#5 PD Informative Assessment: Routine, Reflective, Rigorous

Book: Informative Assessment: When it’s Not About a Grade-Corwin

#6 PD Problem Based Learning: PBL in a Nutshell

Book: Problem Based Learning for Deeper Thinking Across Content Areas-Pete & Fogarty- ASCD

Leadership

#1 PD Staff Room to Classroom I: Planning and Coaching Adult Learners

Book: Staff Room to Classroom I: Planning and Coaching Professional Learning-Fogarty & Pete-Corwin

#2 PD Coaching for Transfer: Feedback is the Breakfast of Champions

Book: Staff Room to Classroom I: Planning and Coaching Professional Learning-Fogarty & Pete-Corwin

#3 PD Presentation and Facilitation Skills

Book: Staff Room to Classroom II: The One Minute PD Planner- Pete & Fogarty-Corwin

#4 PD School Leaders Guide to the Common Core: Achieving Results Through Rigor,Relevance

Book: School Leaders’ Guide to the Common Core: Achieving Results Through Rigor and Relevance-Solution Tree

#5 PD Leadership Series:

1-Four Roles of the Staff Developer

2-Coaching and Feedback

3.Sage on the Stage; Guide on the Side

Different Brains, Different Learners | Solution Tree Blog

Different Brains, Different Learners
Robin J. Fogarty August 9, 2016

Different Brains, Different Learners encapsulates the raison d’être for differentiated classrooms. Simply put, every brain of every learner is different. Students know different stuff, have been to different places, read different books, and prefer different pastimes, hobbies, and sports. Thus, it follows that every brain learns differently because it harbors a different schema. It has connected and chunked different patterns of facts, knowledge, and understanding.

In the search of differentiated strategies for the plethora of diverse learners that are part and parcel of every school and most classrooms, there are five categories to consider. Each has its own sets of talents and limitations, and each has the individual personalities of strengths and weakness to address. Among the five are:

Developing Learners…who are still moving into their fullness
Struggling Learners…who already have a legacy of learning difficulties
English Learners…who are catching up on language
Advanced, Gifted, and Talented Leaners…who know, are bored by, and are biding time with present material
SPED Learners…who need specific agendas for their identified talents and special needs
Different Strokes for Different Folks: Strategies for Diverse Learners

Brief listings of effective teaching & learning strategies to revisit or try on. In addition, a targeted picture book is named to use metaphorically with teachers, parents, and students.

Developing Learners: “Leo, the Late Bloomer”-Kraus

Identify and Make-up Gaps
Direct Instruction
Structured Activities
Concrete Activities
Fewer Steps
Close to Experience
Simpler Reading
Deliberate Pace
Struggling Learners: “Falling Through the Cracks”-Sollmon

Identify and Make-up Gaps
Direct Instruction
Structured Activities
Concrete Activities
Fewer Steps
Close to Experience
Simpler Reading
Deliberate Pace
High Interest
English Learners: “The Five Chinese Brothers”-Wise

Cooperative Buddy-Strong Learner
Translation Partner
Visuals, Graphic Organizers
Pictures, Drawings
Root words
Gestures, Pantomime
Completion vs Construction
Internet self-correcting activities
Advanced, Talented, Gifted: “Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge”–Foxx

Skip Mastered Material
Complex Activity
Open-ended Activity
Abstract Activity
Multifaceted Activity
Advanced Reading
Activity with Depth
Compact Information
Advanced Placement
SPED-Special Needs:“What’s Wrong with Timmy”-Shiver

Individual Education Plan
Classroom Aide
Peer Tutor, Cooperative Partner
Specialists, Resource Teachers
Software Feedback Tools
Classroom Environment
Customized Furniture
Parent Involvement
Facilities Modifications
Appropriate Materials

via Different Brains, Different Learners | Solution Tree Blog

Thinkabouts About Thinking Classes

Challenges and Realities of PBL-Thom Markham  Appropriate vocabulary, exchange of ideas, cogent solution explanation, insight, evidence perseverance, self-management, flexibility, resilience, creativity

Washington post Valerie Strauss  What a classroom engaged in real learning looks like: “Letting kids move in class isn’t a break from learning. It IS learning,”

Independent Problem-Solving  It’s a place where students are doing as much of the talking and thinking and problem solving as the teacher. It’s a place where students are tackling questions and problems that are relevant to their daily lives.

Students Struggling and Persevering: The teacher intentionally creates the kind of classroom environment where this productive struggle can occur, knowing that it encourages independent thinking and supports deeper learning.

Physical Movement and Serious Play  teachers can incorporate physical tasks such as “indoor ice skating” allowing students to deepen their understanding of concepts from geometry to geography as they simultaneously refine their motor skills and build spatial awareness.

Students imagining creative approaches to challengesShe makes way for students to use their imagination: “Instead of handing them an entire lab that’s already mapped out for them, step by step by step, like all the old lab manuals do, I have been much better at stripping away all of the unnecessary so they can discover it themselves.” In order to teach a unit on osmosis and diffusion in her ninth-grade biology class, Eileen tasks students with planning and carrying out their own investigations into what happens when gummy bears are soaked in a variety of solutions.

Real World Connections. For the high school students enrolled in Real World History, an Inspired Teaching course offered in partnership with D.C. Public Schools, drawing connections between textbooks and the world around them is a critical part of coursework. In one project, students learn about the Great Migration by interviewing elder Washingtonians who migrated from the South about their reactions to Jacob Lawrence’s “Migration Series,” featured at the Phillips Collection.

 Wide Variety of Student Work and Types of Assessment.…displays student work that can’t be captured by tests alone. There are pickles students made in chemistry class, statistical graphs showing results from a survey of their classmates on gardening habits…

Student-led Discussions. After participating in a Paideia seminar on reparations, Real World History students independently organize a viewing and discussion of the film “Selma” with students from a local independent school. Students engage in a discussion about the civil rights movement, the current state of civil rights in the United States, and the role they might play in movements such as #blacklivesmatter.

 Social-Emotional Skills and Empathy….empathy is seamlessly integrated into their lessons, both as a cognitive skill — building understanding of others’ perspectives in order to develop a more sophisticated worldview — and as a social-emotional one. When a student is disruptive, she is asked, “How is your behavior affecting the classroom community? Are you it helping it or hurting it?”

The next time you have the opportunity to visit a classroom, take a moment to observe closely. Do you see compliance or true engagement? Are students pulling facts out of a book or are they building independent problem-solving skills and meaningful connections?

Just as in life, the answers in excellent classrooms need to be earned and never spoon-fed. The same is true for the questions. When you visit a classroom and are able to fill your bingo card, you’re seeing inquiry-based instruction that empowers students and positions them to be leaders of their own learning. Every child deserves that type of education.

What other “bingo card boxes” would you add to the list?

The next time you have the opportunity to visit a classroom, take a moment to observe closely. Do you see compliance or true engagement? Are students pulling facts out of a book or are they building independent problem-solving skills and meaningful connections?

Just as in life, the answers in excellent classrooms need to be earned and never spoon-fed. The same is true for the questions. When you visit a classroom and are able to fill your bingo card, you’re seeing inquiry-based instruction that empowers students and positions them to be leaders of their own learning. Every child deserves that type of education.

What other “bingo card boxes” would you add to the list?

 

Let’s all get back to teaching . . .

Robin and I believe that teachers are not expected to or not allowed to teach in an authentic way that will  Invite the Learner In Excite Them Through Engagement Ignite Their Curiosity to Learn

If you Google “reading programs for sale” and you get 157,000 hits in .46 seconds . . . Schools are chocked full of miracle programs purchased by administrations who need to show that they are doing something to improve schools test scores.

Here is a silly video we put together that speaks to the absurdity of the current situation

Design Thinking and PBL | Edutopia

This is a great point that has to be considered when introducing new ideas!

Consider this conundrum: much of what we know about teaching comes from 16+ years of observation as students. In no other profession do you spend that much time watching the previous generation before being told to change everything once you take control. Without the framework or scaffolding for that change, it’s truly unreasonable to tell educators, “OK, start innovating.”

Source: Design Thinking and PBL | Edutopia

Why Do “innovations” Fail?

1-Why do smaller size classrooms show little change in the data?
Because the style of teaching remained the same.
John Hattie of Visible Learning fame, currently the latest “thing” in education, famously based his work on a meta-analysis of factors that influence student achievement. His results showed that class size had little impact when compared to other strategies. The reasons can be simply explained, if the number of students in the class is reduced but the teacher does not take advantage of the change with different teaching methods there is no measurable positive effect.
Class size
2-Why does integrated technology harbor a cloud of doubt about it’s value?
Because low level instruction delivered with technology is still low level instruction.
People seem to think that 21st-century education is all about technology. It’s not. Granted, technology can be used as a tool to enrich the learning and teaching experience. But the best way to prepare our children for the new millennium’s challenges is by simply allowing them to learn and think independently.
Good instruction challenges students to think, to connect, to find relevance and to ultimately be able to transfer and apply what they have learned in a unique and different context. If technology can contribute to or enhance this process then technology as part of instruction is great. But when kids cut pictures out of magazines and pasted them to poster boards and display the posters in the hallway there is little critical thinking. And so if the kids, using 21st Century technology download images from the web and then upload them to a class website where they are viewed by parents but there is still no critical thinking . . . This is may be why acceptance of technology is lagging . . .
3-Why doesn’t inquiry learning (PBL, Projects) have a bigger impact on achievement?
Because when an inquiry-based project results in 24 similar student-generated products, it’s not really inquiry-based learning.
 
Authentic inquiry-based learning consistently student generated work that has similar in characteristics but are very different from one another. When students are control of their own learning journey every product will be as unique as each child. What does it say if the goal of inquiry-based learning is “discovery” and at the end of the lesson every child has discovered the same thing?